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Pact kickoff 18 april 2024

We reflect on a splendid day filled with new connections, knowledge, inspiration, and, of course, motivation to embark on our mission: accelerating the transition to a climate-neutral and climate-resilient world. On this page, we share the relevant resources and information, but we also warmly invite you to take the logical next step: to join the KIN Pact. Still want to read more? Learn more about the Pact here or view the Pact strategy document here.

Photos

Last update: 25th April 2024

3 photos have been released and may be shared. Please ensure to credit photographer Jasmijn de Lange. The remaining photos will be available around the 10th May. They will be published in the same folder. The photos are protected with a password to ensure the privacy of the attendees. All attendees have received this password via email. If you need the photos for any purpose but haven’t received or have misplaced the password, please send us an email.

Table chairs

  • Anneke Hiemstra (Planetary health)

  • Manon Veldhoven (Transdisciplinary approaches in transitions)

  • Reint Jan Renes (Education and learning)

  • Wouter Verduyn (Granular energy networks)
    • Jeike Wallenga (Methods for system transition)

  • Lorenzo Squintani (Citizen participation)

  • Jelle Stronks (Science-Policy Interface)

  • Jeroen Rijke (Water-Soil-Network steering) [Professor (lecturer) Sustainable River Management]

Guide for working on transitions

During the thematic tables at the launch, the topics of ‘transition’, ‘circular economy’, and ‘practical tools’ were frequently mentioned. These topics are nicely brought together in a guide recently published by Het Groene Brein. The manual combines various transition theories and is structured around eight questions. By answering these, one evaluates the transition process and generates steps that an organization can take to further their transition. The manual was written in collaboration with scientists from various universities.

Sign Up

Ready to become an official member? Fantastic! You can do this by signing the KIN core values and drafting a pledge outlining your contribution to the Pact. First, fill out the registration form, and then we’ll get back to you.

Concrete feedback and reports from the thematic tables

Last update: 9th May 2024

During the Pact launch on 18th April 2024, substantive discussions were held on themes. These themes are ongoing and potential initiatives that we want to undertake within the KIN Pact. Participants of the KIN Pact can engage in thematic working groups.

Proposed FOLLOW-UP procedure for working groups:

  1. Survey by the KIN team among Pact participants: who is interested and has expertise to participate?
  2. First meeting: scoping. What is the question, who should be at the table, what ‘output’ is desired (activity, knowledge product), what can participants gain and contribute?
  3. Follow-up meetings will be scheduled.

 

The table discussions during the launch serve both to get to know each other in this network and to orientate on types of themes and provide KIN input on which themes to work on. For reference, here are the highlights of the table discussions.

Planetary Health concerns the perspective that human health and the environment are interconnected. Following the KNAW report on this theme, two lines of thought have emerged, namely the necessity of sustainability within the healthcare sector itself and the integration of health into policy. The latter challenge involves a systemic transition where KIN could potentially play a role. Discussions were held on existing initiatives, actors involved, identified barriers, and potential actions.

Key discussion points:

  1. Incorporating existing philosophies, knowledge, experience, and connections.
  2. Encouraging networking and collaboration.
  3. Defining Planetary Health and linking multiple perspectives.
  4. Identifying barriers to addressing Planetary Health comprehensively.
  5. Determining focus on themes where challenges and perspectives intersect.


Proposal for actions to KIN:

  1. Encouraging networking and collaboration.
  2. Defining Planetary Health.
  3. Linking multiple perspectives.
  4. Determining focus on relevant themes.

Attendees: Florijn Dekkers, UMCU, Green Labs, Joost van der Ree, RIVM, Climate Program Manager, Joseline Houwmen, Radboud Nijmegen, Marc Davidson, Radboud, Professor of Ethics, Anneke Hiemstra, Pharos, Frank Pierik (ZonMW)

The Green Brain and the KIN have joined forces to establish a community of practice (CoP) on Interdisciplinary Working for Transitions. The Green Brain recently released a practical guide for interdisciplinary work; the KIN aims to promote interdisciplinary work to accelerate climate transitions.

1) What do you want to achieve from the Community of Practice?

  • NETWORKING
    * Forge new contacts and networking opportunities.

  • KNOWLEDGE and INSIGHT
    * Broaden horizons and perspectives.
    * Exchange practical work methods.
    * Recognition of the values of interdisciplinary work.
    * Accelerate and strengthen our own agenda.

  • HOW
    * Reading and reflection groups with experts and interdisciplinary practitioners.
    * Collecting and sharing success stories and cases.
    * Organizing conferences on interdisciplinary work.
    * Support and funding for workshops (by and for members).
    * Structure and maintenance of activities. Mentorship programs.

  1. What will the Community of Practice bring?

  • NETWORKING
    * Exchange and collaboration with other organizations such as CS NL, Impact Alliances, NEWS, networks of lecturers, and MBO’s practorates.
    * Engagement with private entities.
    * Collaboration with the Global Transdisciplinary Alliance.

  • KNOWLEDGE and INSIGHT
    * Frameworks around ethics, addressing power dynamics.
    * Clear frameworks for interdisciplinary work.
    * Exploration of how interdisciplinary work can accelerate transition.
    * Research on cultural considerations and best practices.

  • HOW
    * Meetings, networking opportunities, at national congresses and symposia.
    * Experimental space, including sharing failures in a safe environment.
    * Training, methodologies, and tools for interdisciplinary work.

Manon van Veldhoven, Cheryl de Boer University of Twente, Katja Kwastek Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Anouk de Plaa Wageningen University, Paquita Perez, Open University, Marc Dijk Maastricht University, Laurens Hessels Rathenau Institute, Dat Nguyen NIOD Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Ineke Malsch Duuuzaam Utrecht 2030 / Ethicschool, David van Rossem, Climate Conversations, Vylon Ooms Association of Insurers

Planetary Health revolves around the perspective that human health and the environment are interconnected. Following the KNAW report on this theme, two lines of thought have emerged: the need for sustainability within the healthcare sector itself and the integration of health into policy. The latter challenge involves a systemic transition where KIN could potentially play a role. Discussions were held on existing initiatives, involved actors, identified bottlenecks, and potential actions.

Key discussion points:

  1. Incorporating existing philosophies, knowledge, experience, and connections.
  2. Encouraging networking and collaboration.
  3. Defining Planetary Health and connecting multiple perspectives.
  4. Identifying barriers to comprehensively addressing Planetary Health.
  5. Determining focus on themes where challenges and perspectives intersect.

Proposal for actions to KIN:

  1. Encouraging networking and collaboration.
  2. Defining Planetary Health.
  3. Connecting multiple perspectives.
  4. Determining focus on relevant themes.

Attendees: Florijn Dekkers, UMCU, Green Labs, Joost van der Ree, RIVM, Climate Program Manager, Joseline Houwmen, Radboud Nijmegen, Marc Davidson, Radboud, Professor of Ethics, Anneke Hiemstra, Pharos, Frank Pierik (ZonMW)

The starting point of the discussion was the question under which conditions the transition from a central to a decentralized system is necessary and feasible.

  • Hypothesis:
    * A granular energy system is more robust and can scale up faster than a central system.
    * Innovation can proceed more quickly, and adjustments can be made more easily.

  • Suggestions and considerations:
    * Justice in the transition to prevent social inequality.
    * Think in terms of an innovation curve, with small steps and experimentation.
    * Finance and insurance: start small and manage risks.
    * Big data as an enabler for the energy transition.
    * Institutional challenges such as slow regulations and permit processes.
    * The importance of craftsmanship, especially from vocational education (MBO).
    * The ‘Ask’ to the KIN: Attention to the social aspects of the transition.
    * Engage in power-free dialogue and involve individual citizens.
    * Promote innovation and provide room for experiments.

Based on Donella Meadows’ Leverage Points (1), the conversation revolved around which aspects are impactful leverage points and which aspects result in less impact.

The most powerful leverage points from the conversation were in line with Meadows’. These are:

  1. The power to transcend paradigms: In other words, how can we organize forces to transcend paradigms or who/what already possesses this power and how can we harness it for good?
  2. The mindset or paradigm out of which the system — its goals, structure, rules, delays, parameters — arises: In other words, how do we recognize the mindset (Moral Ambition, Inner Compass, IDGs) and paradigms underlying the emergence of the system (goals, structure, rules, delays, parameters) and how do we change them?

CALL TO ACTION to KIN

Give paradigm shifts, systemic thinking, and big thinking a prominent place!

Align with existing movements, including:

  • Earth4All (2), an international initiative to accelerate necessary system change based on system dynamics.
  • Contains system methodologies and models, is utilized by TU Delft in a program on Climate Change and Mobility.
  • LLKS (National Lecturers Platform Climate Change and System Transitions) is working on an inventory of system change methodologies. The insights from this workshop will be included, and participants are asked to contribute to the creation of the whitepaper. Link these to (existing) Transition approaches (including 3).

Sources:

  • Donella Meadows’ Leverage Points: Link
  • Earth4All.life (book PDF): Link
  • Link
  • Challenges in practice:
    * Constraints such as time, manpower, budget, and expertise lead to errors.
    * Local governments often plan top-down, resulting in proposals that neighborhoods do not welcome.

  • Knowledge gaps in citizen consultation:
    * Lack of methods to effectively organize citizen collaboration.
    * Insufficient research on better integrating top-down policy tasks and bottom-up citizen initiatives.
    * Lack of knowledge on engaging hard-to-reach groups, such as climate skeptics.

  • Importance of involving various parties, including:
    * Community workers; Neighbourhood managers; Religious institutions; Local associations; Schools

  • Proposed concrete actions:
    * Organizing specific meetings on citizen collaboration.
    * Supporting comparative studies on citizen collaboration.
    * Establishing a national knowledge platform on citizen collaboration.
    * Promoting international collaboration and educational initiatives in citizen collaboration.
    * Advocating for more action research from funding bodies.

The science policy interface addresses how we can better utilize knowledge for evidence-based policy, particularly in issues related to climate transitions. The debate focused on how KIN Pact can contribute to this goal.

KIN Pact plays a central role in two functions: 1) Continuation and 2) Connection.

  1. Existing connections, “paths” linking policy makers and knowledge workers
  • These connections are already valuable.
  • Advice is to broaden these knowledge paths, where KIN can play a role.
  • Connections can be strategically organized even further.

  1. Utilize existing perspectives/knowledge/experience and connections
  • Continue building on these!

  1. Facilities for answering urgent questions
  • Initiatives already exist in this area, but they can be further expanded.
  • Involve a broader group of partners.

  1. Involving “everyone” from the start of policy and knowledge initiatives (such as a strategic knowledge agenda, calls)
  • Not just researchers (including lecturers and practorates) and policymakers, but also citizens, NGOs, etc.
  • Make knowledge dissemination an integral part of the work from the beginning.

  1. Strategic knowledge development
  • Ad hoc approaches are good, but not exclusively.
  • Involve a broader range of institutions.

  1. Awareness of (each other’s) values
  • Make values explicit.
  • Avoid depoliticization.

The discussion involved representatives from ministries (EZK, I&W, and OCW), NWO, NWO-NWA, RVO, WKR Rathenau Institute, government knowledge institutions, and planning bureaus. Note: no representation from universities.

  • How do we govern Water-Soil networks? Do we already have sufficient understanding of what Water-Soil governance entails (especially in different regions)?
  • At what level do you want to examine the system? Are you looking at what the Netherlands needs (in terms of production) or do you see the Netherlands as a fertile delta for the world?
  • How does the system collaborate? What is the role of the public vs. the role of the private sector? How do you speak the same language?
  • Cultural change for the entire society. Awareness. Justice. How can you create support and awareness?
  • Linking opportunities; integration.
  • Long-term perspective.
  • Opportunities for KIN: Creating a 10-year ‘umbrella’ -> enabling long-term decision-making framework.
  • Opportunities for KIN: Awareness campaign for citizens, businesses, and decision-makers (+ substantive course).

Heleen de Coninck

Heleen de Coninck is one of the two Dutch participants in the scoping session for the IPCC Special Report on Climate Change and Cities. She is professor in system transitions, innovation and climate change at both Eindhoven Technical University and Radboud University. Heleen was a coordinating lead author in the  IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C (2018) as well as the mitigation part of the AR6 (2022). She is also the vice-chair of the Netherlands Scientific Climate Council, which advises the Dutch government on climate policy.

Anne-Marie Hitipeuw

Anne-Marie Hitipeuw is one of the two Dutch participants the scoping session for the IPCC Special Report on Climate Change and Cities. She is the senior policy advisor on knowledge for climate adaptation at the Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and Water Management, where she is responsible for developing policy on flooding and monitoring climate adaptation. Before she joined the Ministry, Anne-Marie was The Hague’s chief resilience officer, responsible for delivering The Hague’s Resilience Strategy.

Bart van den Hurk

Bart van den Hurk is co-chair of the IPCC working group II: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability for the 7th IPCC assessment report, and previous co-author of the 6th IPCC assessment report. He is an expert on weather- and climate modelling, with a long career at the Royal Dutch Metereological Institute (KNMI). Bart is also the current scientific director of Deltares.

Andy van den Dobbelsteen

Andy van den Dobbelsteen is professor of Climate Design & Sustainability at Delft Technical University. His work focuses on the development of sustainable building and sustainable energy systems. He has worked with many local governments and heritage institutions on sustainability and climate adaptation projects.

Leo Meyer

Leo Meyer is the former deputy head of the Dutch Ministry of environmental affairs (VROM). He has had a longstanding involvement with the IPCC, and was co-author as well as the head of the technical support unit for the 2015 IPCC synthesis report on climate change, 5th assessment. He currently works as a freelance consultant on climate policy with Climate Contact-Consultancy, and is a guest lecturer at the Earth sciences department at Utrecht University.

Esther van Rijswijk

Esther van Rijswijk will lead the discussions throughout the day. Esther is a moderator with an impressive record of moderating debates on a great variety of societal issues, and with many different organizations. She has a background in economics and has formerly worked as correspondent for Elsevier and RTL.

Michiel van den Hout

Michiel van den Hout is the first and current director of the Climate Research Initiative Netherlands (KIN). Originally a physicist, he has worked for several companies and subsequently in the field of science-funding and policy and as head of strategy at NWO-I, the institute organization of NWO, from whence Michiel has been involved in the founding of the KIN. Michiel will briefly introduce the KIN and its ambitions at the start of the day.